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Report of Birth Abroad

Documenting your Ecuadorian-born child as a U.S. Citizen

Is your Child a U.S. Citizen?

When a child is born to at least one U.S. citizen parent outside of the United States, U.S. law may confer citizenship on the child, depending on various factors.  Citizenship laws are complex, and it is impossible to address all factual situations here.  Below, however, are the most common ones:

  • A child is born abroad to a U.S. citizen father and a non-U.S. citizen mother, and the parents were married at the time of the birth:
    The child will qualify for citizenship if the father was present in the United States for at least five years, including two years after the age of 14, before the birth of the child.
  • A child is born abroad to a U.S. citizen father and a non-U.S. citizen mother, and the parents were not married at the time of the birth:
    The child may qualify for citizenship if the father was present in the United States for at least five years, including two years after the age of 14, before the birth of the child.  In addition, before the child turns 18, the father must either legitimate the child under Ecuadorian law or sign a statement in front of a notary public or U.S. consular officer in which he acknowledges paternity.  The father must also sign a statement in front of a notary public or U.S. consular officer in which he promises to support the child until the child is 18 years old.
  • A child is born abroad to a U.S. citizen mother and a non-U.S. citizen father, and the parents were married at the time of the birth:
    The child is a U.S. citizen if the mother was present in the United States for at least five years, including two years after she was 14 years old, before the birth of the child.
  • A child is born abroad to a U.S. citizen mother and a non-U.S. citizen father, and the parents were not married at the time of the birth:
    The child is a U.S. citizen if the mother was physically present in the United States for at least one continuous year before the child's birth, regardless of the mother's age at the time she was present.
  • A child is born abroad to two U.S. citizen parents, regardless of whether they are married at the time of the birth:
    The child is a U.S. citizen if at least one of the parents has resided in the United States for at least some portion of his/her life.  The law does not set out a minimum period of time during which the parent must have resided in the United States.

In some cases, time spent overseas working for the U.S government and other organizations may count under the physical presence requirements noted above.  Other specific laws may also affect citizenship in particular cases.  If you think your child may be a U.S. citizen but you are not sure, please contact the American Citizen Services office at ACSQuito@state.gov for guidance.

If Your Foreign-Born Child is a U.S. Citizen: How to Document Your Child

If your child was born outside of the United States and you believe he/she is a U.S. citizen, your first step is to apply for the child's Consular Report of Birth Abroad.  This document serves as proof of U.S. citizenship and is generally a prerequisite for the issuance of a U.S. passport.  Although applications are accepted up until the child's 18th birthday, you should apply for your child's Consular Report of Birth Abroad as soon after his/her birth as practical.  Applications submitted years after the child's birth may take significant time to resolve because evidence to prove the child's citizenship may be difficult to obtain. In some delayed cases it may impossible to establish the child’s citizenship.

To request a Consular Report of Birth in the Quito Consular District, an application must be personally submitted to the U.S. Embassy in Quito during ACS public hours.

While the Consular Report of Birth Abroad is an essential document, it is not a travel document.  Consequently, at the same time that you apply for your child’s Consular Report of Birth Abroad, you may also apply for his/her U.S. passport.  There is no need to request separate appointments to apply for your child’s Consular Report of Birth Abroad and passport; you may apply for both at the same time.

Finally, most parents will also want to apply for their child’s Social Security number, which is required for most U.S. government services, or to declare a child as a dependent on the parents’ U.S. tax returns.  Once you have received the Consular Report of Birth Abroad and the passport, you may submit your application for your child's Social Security.

Who must appear at the time of application?

In all cases, the child and at least one of the parents must appear in person at the time of application.  If practical, both parents should accompany the child, since the consular officer will be better able to determine citizenship if he/she has the opportunity to interview both parents in person.  If only one parent is present, the consular officer has the discretion, depending on the facts of the case, to withhold a determination of citizenship pending an interview with both parents.  Additionally, bear in mind that both parents must ordinarily appear or otherwise consent to the issuance of the child’s U.S. passport.  Please see our passport information for details about this consent requirement and further instructions about the passport application process.

Basic Requirements:

  1. Child's Ecuadorian Birth Certificate from the Civil Registry of Ecuador.
    Either the "Copia Integra de la Inscripción de Nacimiento" (the handwritten long form) or the new birth certificate form implemented by the Civil Registry on April 5, 2010 for children born on or after that date and that were registered in the Provincial Direction office, which includes the child's ID number.  You can request this birth certificate at the Registro Civil Turubamba.  Other versions of Ecuadorian birth certificates cannot be accepted.
    Original and one (1) copy.
  2. Parent's marriage certificate.
    If in Ecuador, the "copia integra de la Inscripcion de Matrimonio"
    If is from another country a certified or notarized copy thereof.
    Original and one (1) copy.
  3. U.S. Passport(s) of the parent(s) that is(are) transmitting citenzenship and proof of identity, passport or cedula. Original and one (1) copy.
  4. Divorce decree of parent(s) previously married, or death cretificate of previous spouse, or certified copy thereof. Original and one (1) copy.
  5. Proof of physical presence in the United States.
  6. The child must be present at the time of application turnover.
  7. Cash or credit card to pay fees.  (See below for details)

Required Forms

When you visit the Embassy, you will be asked to submit up to five different forms.  To keep your visit as short as possible, we ask that you print and complete these forms before your visit.  Please do not sign any of the forms.

  • Application for the Consular Report of Birth Abroad - DS-2029 (PDF 421kb): This form can be filled out and signed by either parent. The signature must be notarized by the consular officer when you submit your application.
  • Application for your child’s Social Security number(PDF 238kb):  A Social security number is required for many U.S. government services, and to declare your child as a dependent on your U.S. tax returns.
  • Affidavit of paternity and physical presence - DS-5507 (PDF 166kb):  This form which must be completed by the U.S. citizen father in case the child if born out of wedlock and the mother is not also a U.S. citizen.  It is not required if both parents are U.S. citizens.  The affidavit requires the U.S. citizen father to acknowledge that the child is his, and to state, as specifically as possible, the parent's periods of physical presence in the United States.  Extra sheets may be attached as necessary.  The document must be notarized or signed in front of the consular officer at the time of application.
  • Application for the child's U.S. passport: While you are not required to apply for your child's passport at the same time that you apply for his/her Consular Report of Birth Abroad, you are encouraged to do so.  Please do not sign the application until the consular officer interviews you.
  • Statement of consent for the issuance of a passport (PDF 157kb):  This form must be submitted if one of the parents does not accompany his/her child to the Consulate.  A parent who cannot appear must fill out the form, sign it in front of a U.S. notary, give the form (original or fax) to the other parent, who must then present it at the time of application, along with a photocopy of the absent parent’s photo ID.  If the parent is unavailable to fill out the consent form, the form may also be used to explain the parent's unavailability in the section titled "special circumstances."  This form must be completed only in English.

Required and Suggested Evidence

  • Proof of physical presence in the United States: In cases in which only one parent is a U.S. citizen, that parent must submit evidence that he/she was present in the United States for the required amount of time prior to the birth of the child.  (See above.)  Such evidence frequently takes the form of passports; tax records, including W-2 forms; pay statements or other evidence of employment; photos; school transcripts; apartment leases; or annual Social Security statements.  These are merely suggestions, and you are encouraged to submit all available documentary proof. If no such evidence is available, the consular officer will advise you at the time of your application what alternatives you may have for proving your presence in the United States.
  • Child's birth certificate: Either the "Copia Integra de la Inscripción de Nacimiento" (the handwritten long form) or the new birth certificate form implemented by the Civil Registry on April 5, 2010 for children born on or after that date and that were registered in the Provincial Direction office, which includes the child's ID number.  You can request this birth certificate at the Registro Civil Turubamba.  Other versions of Ecuadorian birth certificates cannot be accepted.
  • Proof of parents' identity: Each parent must submit an original and a copy of a government-issued photo ID, such as a driver's license or Ecuadorian cedula, or the photo page of his/her passport.
    If parents are married - proof of parents' marriage and termination of previous marriages: If the child's parents are married, the consular officer will also request a certified copy of their marriage certificate.  If either parent has been married previously, the consular officer will request evidence that any previous marriages were terminated, such as a certified divorce decree or death certificate.  While these documents are not always required, it is to your advantage to bring them in case the consular officer requests them.
  • Proof of paternity/maternity: In cases in which paternity or maternity is in question, the Consular Officer may request additional proof.  Sometimes this proof may take the form of family photographs, baptism records, or other documents.  In other cases, DNA testing may be suggested. If DNA testing is required, the test has to be performed under specific guidelines.
     
    Please Note:  In the event that paternity is not confirmed, ACS Quito is not able to refund the fees paid for Consular Report of Birth Abroad.
  • Records of Pregnancy: If available, records of the mother's pregnancy.  For example, sonograms, doctor's certificates, photographs of mother during pregnancy.
  • Additional evidence: The consular officer, in his/her discretion, may request additional documents or other evidence as necessary.  You will be advised at the time of application if such evidence is required in your case.
  • Photos: No photo is required for the Consular Report of Birth Abroad however we recommend, and insist, to process the passport application in addition to the Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA).  The process will be less complicated if is done together.

    If you decide to apply for your child's passport, you must bring two recent photos of the child, measuring 5x5 cm (2x2 inches) and with a white background.  Verify the photo requirements.  The photo is identical to the photo used for a U.S. visa.  Photo labs are abundant in major cities around Ecuador, as well as a few block near the Embassy.

Fees

  • The cost of applying for a Consular Report of Birth Abroad is US $100.00, and is not refundable even if your application is denied.
  • The fee for applying for your child's passport is an additional US $105.00, also non-refundable.
  • These fees are payable at the time of application. You may pay with cash, with a certified check from a U.S. bank or with a credit card (Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover or Diners).  Local or personal checks are not accepted.

 
Pickup of Documents

Your child's Consular Report of Birth Abroad and U.S. passport will be available for pickup from 10 to 15 working days after your application is approved.

If you apply for your child’s Social Security number, a Social Security card will be delivered to you by international mail directly from the Social Security Administration to your address in Ecuador.  Because of delays in processing of overseas Social Security applications, delivery of your child’s card will take 8-12 months.  If one of the child’s parents will be in the United States before the card arrives, you are encouraged to visit a Social Security office while there to request an update on your application.  Please visit the Social Security Administration’s website for the location of Social Security offices in the United States.

Children Born in Other Foreign Countries

If your child was born in another foreign country but is currently in Ecuador, you may still submit an application for the child's Consular Report of Birth Abroad and passport in Ecuador, as described above.  Your application will then be sent to the U.S. Embassy or to a U.S. Consulate in the country where your child was born, and a consular officer there will make a determination of the child's citizenship.  This process may take several months, and you are therefore encouraged to apply in the country where your child was born, if practical.

Replacement Copies of your Consular Report of Birth Abroad

Official copies of a previously issued Consular Report of Birth Abroad are not available from the Consulate and must be requested directly from the Department of State in Washington.

Please see the Department of State website, under the "Obtaining copies of the FS-240, DS-1350, and Panama Canal zone birth certificate" section, for ordering instructions.

Questions or Comments regarding Consular Report of Birth Abroad

If you have any aquestions or need specific orientation about your case, please send us an e-mail to the American Citizen Section: ACSQuito@state.gov.